Dementia

Memory Cafe—Lunch in San Francisco

Second Thursday of the Month—Lunch in San Francisco

When: 11:30 am to 1:00 pm
Where: Crossroads Café, 699 Delancey Street, San Francisco, CA 94107

Join us at Crossroads Café and Bookstore, just off the Embarcadero.

The Crossroads Café is the casual eatery of the Delancey Foundation and Restaurant in San Francisco. We enjoy the enclosed outdoor garden and gather along Italian style dinner tables for finger food, soup and salad. On rainy days we find shelter in the middle of the bookstore.

Lunch and (non-alcoholic) drinks are provided by Memory Café.

The monthly cost for the Memory Café is $20, charged whether participants attend one or more events in the month.

Sign Up for This Event

The Memory Café is a weekly gathering for people experiencing mild to moderate memory loss and their caregivers—spouses, family members, and friends. These gatherings and activities are created to benefit the person with dementia as well as those providing care, and the activities are designed to engage and support both simultaneously.

For more information about Seniors At Home Memory Café or to register for the program, please contact Program Director, Alana Goldscheid at 415-449-3849 or email [email protected].

Memory Cafe—Lunch in San Francisco

Second Thursday of the Month—Lunch in San Francisco

When: 11:30 am to 1:00 pm
Where: Crossroads Café, 699 Delancey Street, San Francisco, CA 94107

Join us at Crossroads Café and Bookstore, just off the Embarcadero.

The Crossroads Café is the casual eatery of the Delancey Foundation and Restaurant in San Francisco. We enjoy the enclosed outdoor garden and gather along Italian style dinner tables for finger food, soup and salad. On rainy days we find shelter in the middle of the bookstore.

Lunch and (non-alcoholic) drinks are provided by Memory Café.

The monthly cost for the Memory Café is $20, charged whether participants attend one or more events in the month.

Sign Up for This Event

The Memory Café is a weekly gathering for people experiencing mild to moderate memory loss and their caregivers—spouses, family members, and friends. These gatherings and activities are created to benefit the person with dementia as well as those providing care, and the activities are designed to engage and support both simultaneously.

For more information about Seniors At Home Memory Café or to register for the program, please contact Program Director, Alana Goldscheid at 415-449-3849 or email [email protected].

Memory Cafe—Lunch in San Francisco

Second Thursday of the Month—Lunch in San Francisco

When: 11:30 am to 1:00 pm
Where: Crossroads Café, 699 Delancey Street, San Francisco, CA 94107

Join us at Crossroads Café and Bookstore, just off the Embarcadero.

The Crossroads Café is the casual eatery of the Delancey Foundation and Restaurant in San Francisco. We enjoy the enclosed outdoor garden and gather along Italian style dinner tables for finger food, soup and salad. On rainy days we find shelter in the middle of the bookstore.

Lunch and (non-alcoholic) drinks are provided by Memory Café.

The monthly cost for the Memory Café is $20, charged whether participants attend one or more events in the month.

Sign Up for This Event

The Memory Café is a weekly gathering for people experiencing mild to moderate memory loss and their caregivers—spouses, family members, and friends. These gatherings and activities are created to benefit the person with dementia as well as those providing care, and the activities are designed to engage and support both simultaneously.

For more information about Seniors At Home Memory Café or to register for the program, please contact Program Director, Alana Goldscheid at 415-449-3849 or email [email protected].

Memory Cafe—Lunch in San Francisco

Second Thursday of the Month—Lunch in San Francisco

When: 11:30 am to 1:00 pm
Where: Crossroads Café, 699 Delancey Street, San Francisco, CA 94107

Join us at Crossroads Café and Bookstore, just off the Embarcadero.

The Crossroads Café is the casual eatery of the Delancey Foundation and Restaurant in San Francisco. We enjoy the enclosed outdoor garden and gather along Italian style dinner tables for finger food, soup and salad. On rainy days we find shelter in the middle of the bookstore.

Lunch and (non-alcoholic) drinks are provided by Memory Café.

The monthly cost for the Memory Café is $20, charged whether participants attend one or more events in the month.

Sign Up for This Event

The Memory Café is a weekly gathering for people experiencing mild to moderate memory loss and their caregivers—spouses, family members, and friends. These gatherings and activities are created to benefit the person with dementia as well as those providing care, and the activities are designed to engage and support both simultaneously.

For more information about Seniors At Home Memory Café or to register for the program, please contact Program Director, Alana Goldscheid at 415-449-3849 or email [email protected].

New Study Reveals the First Sign of Alzheimer’s and It Might Surprise You

Though most of us might assume that the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease is memory loss, new research suggests that trouble with navigation may happen first.

The study has found that well before a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s can be made, patients struggle with mapping and finding their way around new surroundings.

Participants were asked to navigate a virtual maze on a computer, using wallpaper patterns and other landmarks for finding their way around. People who had preclinical Alzheimer’s showed significant difficulties in forming a cognitive map of the environment, compared to other members of the population.

First sign of Alzheimer's

“These findings suggest that navigational tasks designed to assess a cognitive mapping strategy could represent a powerful new tool for detecting the very earliest Alzheimer’s disease-related changes in cognition,” says Denise Head, senior author of the study and Associate Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.

Understanding the way that changes related to Alzheimer’s develop in the brain could ultimately lead to earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, which would enable patients to access support and services before memory loss develops.

Andrea Korsunsky, Director of Seniors At Home’s Center for Dementia Care, says, “We welcome research that seeks to identify the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease. The earlier we can diagnose Alzheimer’s, the sooner people with the disease and their families can seek medical interventions and support to help reduce some of the challenges that come with memory loss, including planning for the future and talking with your family about what is important to you.”

If you are caring for a loved one who is experiencing Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, our Center for Dementia Care can help.

To find out more or schedule your family’s dementia care consultation, call Seniors At Home at 844-222-3212 or contact us online. 

How Seniors can Boost Brain-Health

It is important to take care of our minds as well our bodies as we age.

Though most seniors are in good mental health, many older adults are at risk of developing neurological and mental health disorders, especially dementia and depression.

seniors playing chess

The good news is that regardless of your age, there are proactive steps you can take to keep your brain healthy and reduce your risk of developing dementia, depression, or other mental conditions. Here are seven ways you can keep up your mental fitness:

  1. Practice using your memory
    Regularly engaging in memory exercises can help improve both short and long-term recall. Make a list of grocery items, for example, and do your best to memorize it – then test yourself an hour later to see how many items you remember. Other ideas for practicing memory skills are doing math in your head, drawing a map of somewhere you have recently been, or memorizing the lyrics to a popular song.
  2. Play ‘thinking’ games
    Research has shown that brain-training games can help keep older adults sharp for as many as 10 years longer.  Whether it’s the daily crossword puzzle, Sudoku, Scrabble or another game that excites you, make an effort to engage in games or puzzles that make you think. If you are looking for online resources, AARP has a library of brain games on their website and DailyCaring has free large-print crossword puzzles for seniors.
  3. Learn something new
    Taking on a new hobby or skill can improve both cognitive functioning and your sense of well-being as you age. Learning a foreign language, for example, is a process of listening and internalizing new sounds which stimulates the brain. The same goes for new artistic or athletic pursuits – whether it’s cooking, painting, tennis, a musical instrument you’ve always wanted to learn – cultivating a new hobby is an excellent way to keep your mind active and learning.
  4. Seek out social interaction 
    When regularly engaging in social activities and having stimulating conversations, seniors are less likely to develop both depression and dementia. Invite loved ones to spend time together or call them if they’re far away, find out what activities are being held in your community or religious group. Maintaining these connections is one of the most effective ways to keep your spirits high and your mind busy and engaged.
  5. Keep stress under control
    Chronic stress can wreck havoc on both the mind and the body, especially as we age. Though it is not always easy to let go of worries, fears, or responsibilities, it is important to make time each day to relax and reflect. Whether meditation, exercise, spending time with an animal (such as through Seniors At Home’s Canine Corps), or treating yourself to a spa treatment makes you feel at ease, taking active steps to reduce stress will help you ward off depression and other mental health concerns such as anxiety or substance abuse.
  6. Maintain physical fitness and a healthy diet
    An active, healthy body is critical in maintaining an active, healthy mind. In fact, recent Alzheimer’s research suggests that making certain lifestyle changes can do more to ward off memory loss than drugs or medical treatments. Eating a balanced, healthy diet, and enjoying physical activity such as walks or group exercise classes is a key way to maximize brain function and improve overall health.
  7. Know where to get help if you need it
    Become familiar with the signs of depression and seek professional help right away if you think you or a loved one is depressed. Seniors At Home offers both individual counseling and support groups, offering a safe space to explore difficult thoughts and feelings.If you or a loved one are experiencing memory loss on a regular basis, seek council from your physician. Seniors At Home’s Center for Dementia Care provides personalized care plans for people with dementia-related conditions, as well as practical and emotional support for families.

To find out how Seniors At Home can help, call 415-449-3777 or contact us online now.

6 Tips for Finding Excellent Dementia Care at Home

Hiring care professionals for your loved one with dementia who is living at home is no simple task. With so much to consider—from the cost of care, to your loved one’s health and safety, to their quality of life—it can be difficult to know exactly what to look for.

We have put together six important things to consider when looking for dementia care to ensure that you find excellent support for your loved one and peace of mind for you and your family.

Senior Patient with Aid

  1. Specialized Training

    Look for caregivers that have been trained in memory care specifically. It is important that the person caring for your loved one knows how to respond to the changes in mood and behavior that often accompany memory loss, and that they know the best approach to support your loved one and minimize any sudden changes in mood or behavior.

  2. Individualized Care

    You know better than anyone that your loved one’s symptoms and care needs are unique. Seek out a dementia care specialist or team that will work with you to create a personalized care plan for your loved one, based on their individual preferences.

  3. Supported Caregivers

    Hiring a caregiver that is the right fit for your loved one is very important. But the highest-quality care often stems from a team approach to dementia care where the caregiver receives ongoing support, training, and access to experts such as gerontologists and social workers. For example, a caregiver, a nurse, a social worker, and a family member are all able to support a person with dementia in different ways, and can work together as a team to provide the most comprehensive care.

  4.  Focus on Engagement

    Often, people with dementia struggle to structure their time, leading to boredom or confusion.  A great dementia care provider will seek out activities that your loved one enjoys in order to facilitate social interactions and engagement throughout the day. Creating these meaningful interactions reduces frustration and enhances your loved one’s quality of life.

  5. Values Identity

    An individual’s identity doesn’t fade just because certain memories are no longer accessible to them. Look for dementia care specialists that will foster your loved one’s unique identity by taking time to learn about who they are and what is important to them. At Seniors At Home’s Center for Dementia Care, for example, our Dementia Specialists talk to family members, friends and even neighbors in order to get to know our clients. Understanding each older adult in this way helps us make a connection with them and honor their dignity.

  6. Support for Family Members

    Your experience with your loved one’s dementia care at home is important too! Look for a dementia care team that provides emotional and practical support to family members when it is needed so that you, your loved one, and other family members can spend more time enjoying one another.

Contact the Center for Dementia Care to learn how we can help your loved one and family:

415-449-3777
[email protected] 

Center for Dementia Care Celebrates Successful First Year

Half of Bay Area residents over 85 are currently experiencing some form of dementia, and by 2020, the region is expected to see a 49% increase in residents with Alzheimer’s disease—not including other related conditions. With so many individuals and their families facing the challenges of these conditions, the need for dedicated local support has never been greater.

That’s why, one year ago, Seniors At Home launched the Center for Dementia Care and took a pioneering leap in enhanced support for people with Dementia-related conditions, and their families and caregivers.

senior with therapist
Dementia deeply affects family members and caregivers. The Center for Dementia Care helps those with dementia live safely and with dignity by providing specialized in-home support along with education and behavioral intervention tools to help caregivers understand memory loss and engage more effectively with their loved one. All Seniors At Home caregivers are also given specialized training to assist to people with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

First year success

“In our first year of operation, the Center for Dementia Care has had an overwhelmingly positive response from clients across the five regions of the Bay Area where we work,” says Traci Dobronravova, Associate Director of Seniors At Home. “It’s clear that specialized support for dementia is wanted by our clients and we are so pleased to be able to help.”

Families report that they feel more confident communicating with their loved one with dementia and that the personal touch and expert assessment they received provided straightforward strategies that were easy to implement to make each day better for their loved one, and themselves.

Joanne, whose mother benefited from a Dementia Care Assessment says: “The visit was tremendous and the recommendations are very helpful and creative.”

Another client says, “Your suggestions are excellent! They are easy to follow and I have had immediate success.”

A personal approach

Symptoms of dementia vary greatly and the Center for Dementia Care provides each of our clients with an individualized care plan that supports quality of life, helps prevent fluctuations in mood and behavior and meets one-on-one with caregivers in a client’s home.

“Our approach to Dementia Care is based on identifying the strengths of the individual with memory loss as opposed to identifying ‘behaviors’,” says Andrea Korsunsky, Coordinator of Center for Dementia Care. “We start with what the person CAN do and develop the care plan from there.”

Dementia awareness and education

The Center is also making great strides toward providing education, information, and support to the community at large. Through the new educational program, ‘Dementia Awareness: A path for families,’ The Center for Dementia Care leads expert panels and group discussions to provide families with the resources, information, and support they will need to navigate their path. As the need for dementia education grows, these programs are made available to the community and are hosted in various locations throughout the bay area.

In the community

The Center for Dementia Care collaborates with local organizations to address the needs of the community and to influence systemic changes in care management for those with memory loss.

One such collaboration has been with the Contemporary Jewish Museum’s Arts Café, which provides a welcoming space in which participants can connect to art and share experiences with others. On October 22nd, the Center for Dementia Care had a wonderful day bringing clients to the Contemporary Jewish Museum for a program that specifically focused on memory loss and on supporting a creative and therapeutic outlet. The Center for Dementia care is also working with the Arts Café to host a Dementia program this coming spring.

Looking to the future

In the coming year, the Center for Dementia Care plans to roll out a Dementia Tool Kit for families, caregivers, and volunteers who are caring for a person with dementia.

Traci Dobronravova says, “The Tool Kit will provide the practical information they need at their fingertips and activities to help them engage more meaningfully with a loved one who has dementia.” Seniors At Home staff will work directly with family members and caregivers on how to utilize the new tools.

The Center for Dementia Care’s future plans also include training volunteers as friends and advocates for Seniors At Home clients with dementia, partnering with other forward-thinking organizations and continuing to provide compassionate care to clients.

To learn more about the Center for Dementia Care or to schedule an appointment with its staff, call 415-449-3777.

If you would like to host a Dementia Awareness Event or learn more about upcoming events, please call:

  • Michelle Javid (San Francisco and Marin Counties): 415-449-3721
  • Joan Goldner (Peninsula): 650-688-3068
  • Barbara Tobin (Sonoma County): 707-303-1510